Skip to main content

October 30, 2014 12:12:00 PMWith HIV Prevention Possibilities on the Rise, an African Cohort Closes in on a Last Checkup
Several years ago, a group of 613 people recently infected with HIV from Uganda, Rwanda, Zambia, Kenya, and South Africa volunteered for a scientific study group led by the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI). This extensive study became known as Protocol C and is the largest acute infection cohort in Africa.
Written by  Guest Blogger 
Category:   | No  Comments |   Links to this post
October 29, 2014 03:17:00 PMTackling Stigma in South Africa
Every market needs an index to benchmark itself. In South Africa they’re setting one to measure public attitudes of intolerance and stigma toward people living with HIV and AIDS.
Written by  Guest Blogger 
Category:   | No  Comments |   Links to this post
October 29, 2014 10:54:00 AMMicrobicide and Vaccine, Sidekicks at Last?
Results from an initial study combining a microbicide candidate and experimental vaccine are promising enough to at least keep Imperial College virologist Robin Shattock coming back for more in pursuing what could be a novel move in preventing HIV infection.
Written by  Guest Blogger 
Category:   | No  Comments |   Links to this post
October 29, 2014 10:46:00 AMMuscle-flexing in Cape Town (with a Smile)
With an incidence of HIV in one hard-hit region of South Africa reaching 44 percent among young pregnant mothers, this part of the world is on the front lines of the public health response to HIV. At the HIV R4P conference in Cape Town on Tuesday, however, South African science minister Naledi Pandor wanted to let the world know her country was no longer a passive participant, content to supply trial volunteers while others did the research.
Written by  Guest Blogger 
Category:   | No  Comments |   Links to this post
October 29, 2014 10:42:00 AMVaccine from Thailand Shows Promise in South Africa

Glenda Gray, executive director of the Wits Health Consortium in South Africa, presented data today at the HIV R4P conference in Cape Town indicating that the prime-boost vaccine candidates initially tested in the RV144 trial in Thailandcross-clade immune responses in a Phase I safety trial conducted in South Africa, with immunogenicity similar to or greater than that of the responses induced in Thai volunteers.

Written by  Guest Blogger 
Category:   | No  Comments |   Links to this post
October 28, 2014 11:30:00 AMBringing Prevention Communities Together in Cape Town
HIV R4P organizers carry high hopes for the first conference attempting to knit together all HIV prevention efforts, says conference co-chair, Sharon Hillier, a University of Pittsburgh professor of obstetrics, gynecology, molecular genetics, and biochemistry.
Written by  Guest Blogger 
Category:   | No  Comments |   Links to this post
October 28, 2014 11:17:00 AMHIV R4P Shadowed by Ebola
As the inaugural HIV R4P conference gets underway in Cape Town, South Africa, the first virus everyone is talking about isn’t HIV. Discussions in the hallways and over coffee start off with another virus: Ebola.
Written by  Guest Blogger 
Category:   | No  Comments |   Links to this post
November 08, 2013 11:28:00 PMKeystone meeting in Rio: Breakthroughs and surprises
“Breakthrough” isn’t a term scientists use often when they talk about a finding. But according to co-organizer Rino Rappuoli of Novartis, attendees of the Keystone meeting on Advancing Vaccines in the Genomics Era, which took place from Oct. 31st until Nov. 4 in Rio de Janeiro, heard talks on not just one, but two breakthroughs, both published in Science on the first day of the meeting: The fine structure of a near-native version of the HIV Envelope trimer, and the proof that in principle, it is possible to use a potent neutralizing antibody as a starting point to design a vaccine immunogen, at least for respiratory syncytial virus.

Attendees also heard a lot about advances in systems biology, an emerging branch of biology where researchers try to measure the parameters of biological “systems” in their entirety. Researchers hope that such a comprehensive approach will provide new insights into how vaccines affect the immune system, and one day help predict whether a vaccine candidate is likely to work.
Written by  Andreas von Bubnoff 
Category: News  | 0  Comments |   Links to this post
November 04, 2013 10:47:00 AMB cells wage a losing battle against HIV
When a virus enters the body, the immune system launches a barrage of antibodies to stop the infection. In the case of HIV, however, the B cells that make those antibodies fail to generate a normal response, even in the early stages of infection, when concentrations of the virus are at their peak. Research published in the October 27th edition of Nature Immunology sheds some light on a potentially major driver of this dysfunction.
Written by  Guest Blogger 
Category:   | 0  Comments |   Links to this post
October 30, 2013 11:18:00 AMAre HIV reservoirs larger than previously suspected?
The perhaps biggest challenge to curing HIV infection is that the virus hides in latently infected, resting memory CD4+ T cells. These cells harbor integrated HIV DNA—the so-called provirus—in their genome. One strategy to eradicate this HIV reservoir is to activate the latently infected cells so that they give themselves away by producing virus again, and then kill these virus producing cells. Because in vitro assays that activate these latently infected cells cause less than 1% of them to produce virus, researchers used to think that the rest of them harbor nonfunctional proviruses. But a new study suggests that the fraction of latently infected cells that harbor functional provirus may be 60 times larger than previously thought (Cell 155, 540, 2013).
Written by  Andreas von Bubnoff 
Category: News  | 0  Comments |   Links to this post
 Next >>